eatsthebest

mattmorriswerks:

PEREGRINEPROGRAM presentsi’m issue; i’m freematt morrismay 4 – 25, 2014opening reception Sunday May 4, 2–4 pm______________________________________________i’m issue; i’m free [1]
“I shall always push through curtains to privacy,and want some whispered words alone.”[2]
 For the past seven months, my studio and library have shared a space. This renders physical the impure quality of my various art activities. My making, writing, and modes of platforming[3] spring into being as interrelated parts; I don’t wish to obfuscate my deep feelings about art history nor the hope I harbor for ways that community can form. This work is intimately entangled with the apparatuses by which my practice is constituted, but also those that I elect to help construct. I’m endlessly curious about what of significance might be apprehended among several positions or along their margins. To traverse these braided pathways—these crisscrossed lines of desire and orientation—I felt that I needed to build a time machine, and so I sewed a pillow. I ravished a piece of velvet with my teeth to get a feeling for a painting Jasper Johns made after he and Rauschenberg broke up.[4] Appropriative gestures in painting became utterly sincere ones. I arranged a private liaison with Jon, one of the sweet people who run peregrineprogram, and hope to tell you more about that after the fact. My mom said, all too eagerly, “At least you’re on the game board!”[5]  


 
[1] Are You Being Served?, created and written by Jeremy Lloyd and David Croft. London: BBC1, 1972–1985[2] Virginia Woolf. The Waves. Ware, Hertforshire: Wordsworth Editions Limited, 2000.


[3] This exhibition coincides with one I’ve curated for the Hills Esthetic Center (128 N Campbell Ave, Chicago, IL 60612). Miss Kilman and She Were Terrible Together opens on the evening of May 9th and continues through June 6th.
[4] Jasper Johns, Painting Bitten by a Man, 1961. Encaustic on canvas mounted on type plate, 9 1/2 x 6 7/8”. Museum of Modern Art.
[5] Clue: The Great Museum Caper. Parker Brothers, 1991.

mattmorriswerks:


PEREGRINEPROGRAM presents

i’m issue; i’m free

matt morris

may 4 – 25, 2014
opening reception Sunday May 4, 2–4 pm

______________________________________________

i’m issue; i’m free [1]

“I shall always push through curtains to privacy,
and want some whispered words alone.”[2]

 
For the past seven months, my studio and library have shared a space. This renders physical the impure quality of my various art activities. My making, writing, and modes of platforming[3] spring into being as interrelated parts; I don’t wish to obfuscate my deep feelings about art history nor the hope I harbor for ways that community can form. This work is intimately entangled with the apparatuses by which my practice is constituted, but also those that I elect to help construct. I’m endlessly curious about what of significance might be apprehended among several positions or along their margins.
 
To traverse these braided pathways—these crisscrossed lines of desire and orientation—I felt that I needed to build a time machine, and so I sewed a pillow. I ravished a piece of velvet with my teeth to get a feeling for a painting Jasper Johns made after he and Rauschenberg broke up.[4] Appropriative gestures in painting became utterly sincere ones. I arranged a private liaison with Jon, one of the sweet people who run peregrineprogram, and hope to tell you more about that after the fact. My mom said, all too eagerly, “At least you’re on the game board!”[5]
 
 

 

[1] Are You Being Served?, created and written by Jeremy Lloyd and David Croft. London: BBC1, 1972–1985
[2] Virginia Woolf. The Waves. Ware, Hertforshire: Wordsworth Editions Limited, 2000.
[3] This exhibition coincides with one I’ve curated for the Hills Esthetic Center (128 N Campbell Ave, Chicago, IL 60612). Miss Kilman and She Were Terrible Together opens on the evening of May 9th and continues through June 6th.
[4] Jasper Johns, Painting Bitten by a Man, 1961. Encaustic on canvas mounted on type plate, 9 1/2 x 6 7/8”. Museum of Modern Art.
[5] Clue: The Great Museum Caper. Parker Brothers, 1991.

mattmorriswerks:

Hills Esthetic Center
128 N Campbell Ave
Chicago, IL 60612

Miss Kilman and She Were Terrible Together
curated by Matt Morris

 
May 10 – June 6, 2014
Opening reception: Saturday, May 10, 7–11 pm

Shinsuke Aso, Luis Miguel Bendaña, Poy Born, Alex da Corte, Dana DeGiulio, Hunter Foster, Jesse Harrod, Richard Hawkins, Matthew Landry, Tony Luensman, Miller/Shellabarger, Ulrike Müller, William J. O’Brien, BD Pack, Daisy Palma, Eric Ruschman, Ryan Shubert, Amy Sillman, Joan Snyder

Claims:
1. The epistemologies typically attributed to an analysis of the material conditions of an artwork’s production are almost always available through a phenomenological encounter with the art object itself.

2. Black is back.

3. There is a space beyond explicit depictions of same-sex coital encounters where eroticism and desire take other forms. Overturn anything and you’re bound to find sex.

4. For a period of time in the late 1950s, Agnes Martin and Ellsworth Kelly’s studios adjoined one another, and on most mornings they breakfasted together. This matters.

5. Coalitions across lines of difference are preferable to the eradication of nuanced subject positions.

6. Codes, closets, and separatism continue to be useful both as historical points of reference, but also as formal moves of constraint to play against the limits of painting.

This exhibition marks the completion of the first iteration of ‘Painting Queer,’ an undergraduate multi-level studio course Matt Morris taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

A small publication will be released in conjunction with the exhibition featuring contributions by David Getsy, Richard Hawkins, Matt Morris, Ulrike Müller, Lisi Raskin, and others.

Louisiana House votes to uphold ban on sodomy

gaywrites:

The Louisiana House yesterday voted to uphold an unconstitutional state ban on sodomy — essentially political jargon for gay sex — as part of its “crimes against nature” law. 

In Lawrence v. Texas in 2003, the Supreme Court ruled that sodomy bans are unconstitutional. But a handful of states, including Louisiana, refuse to change their anti-sodomy laws. While the statute technically can’t be used as a basis to arrest people, Louisiana deputies have reportedly made sodomy-related arrests recently, inciting a lawmaker to try to repeal it. 

Against all logic or reason, on Tuesday, the state House voted 66-27 to keep the anti-sodomy law in place. 

In a letter urging Louisiana lawmakers to reject the proposal, the influential Christian lobbying organization wrote, “Louisiana’s anti-sodomy statute is consistent with the values of Louisiana residents who consider this behavior to be dangerous, unhealthy, and immoral.”

In a hearing earlier this month, Bill Smith, a member of the Louisiana Family Forum, told committee members that anti-sodomy laws save the lives of gay people by decreasing their exposure to HIV.

"I have homosexuals in my family. I’m here out of love and concern for the health of these people," Smith said in April. “The fact is this opens up ways for them to really kill themselves.”

I want to scream and cry and throw things. 

(via at0m-ick)

nickrobertsxxx:

…yes kids, thats my #DirtyCOCK hanging out of my pocket dripping SEED, sorry IM JUST THAT BIG #bigdick #bbbh #showoff
-nick r.

nickrobertsxxx:

…yes kids, thats my #DirtyCOCK hanging out of my pocket dripping SEED, sorry IM JUST THAT BIG #bigdick #bbbh #showoff

-nick r.

rufus666:

Victor Hugo, circa 1866; pen, brush, brown ink and wash on cream paper. It can be found in Shadows of a Hand: The Drawings of Victor Hugo. Luc Sante titled his essay on Hugo—included in his book Kill All Your Darlings—after this drawing. Note that the tentacles form the letters V and H. Hugo pasted this drawing into his own manuscript of Toilers of the Sea, where it corresponds to the following text:

At night, however, and particularly in the hot season, she becomes phosphorescent. This horrible creature has her passions, she awaits her submarine nuptials. She adorns herself, setting herself alight and illuminating herself; and from the height of some rock she may be seen in the deep obscurity of the waves below, expanding with a pale aureole — a spectral sun.

rufus666:

Victor Hugo, circa 1866; pen, brush, brown ink and wash on cream paper. It can be found in Shadows of a Hand: The Drawings of Victor Hugo.

Luc Sante titled his essay on Hugo—included in his book Kill All Your Darlings—after this drawing. Note that the tentacles form the letters V and H.

Hugo pasted this drawing into his own manuscript of Toilers of the Sea, where it corresponds to the following text:

At night, however, and particularly in the hot season, she becomes phosphorescent. This horrible creature has her passions, she awaits her submarine nuptials. She adorns herself, setting herself alight and illuminating herself; and from the height of some rock she may be seen in the deep obscurity of the waves below, expanding with a pale aureole — a spectral sun.

(via havesexwithghosts)

inventaire:

Autumn is setting in and the air has turned brisk and I’m daydreaming about the glow of the mediterranean — a dream aided by some incredible super-8 footage shot by Derek Jarman during the production of SEBASTIANE and this sun god brandishing a golden codpiece. Take me there…