eatsthebest

theparisreview:

Self-portrait by Alberto Giacometti. James Lord writes in his introduction, “He works in a state of intimate excitement with his materials, his long strong functional hands never still, never quite clean of contact with his work … The figures and objects are seen by the artist not as pretexts but as ends in themselves and are to be seen similarly by us.”

theparisreview:

Self-portrait by Alberto Giacometti. James Lord writes in his introduction, “He works in a state of intimate excitement with his materials, his long strong functional hands never still, never quite clean of contact with his work … The figures and objects are seen by the artist not as pretexts but as ends in themselves and are to be seen similarly by us.”

(via chgohunt)


'The Father Prepares His Dead Son’s Body for Burial' by Duane Michals, 1968.

'The Father Prepares His Dead Son’s Body for Burial' by Duane Michals, 1968.

(Source: boyclouds, via hipersexual)

fuck

AT THE HEART of the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century there was an almost miraculous improvement in the tools of production, which was accompanied by a catastrophic dislocation of the lives of the common people…Nowhere has liberal philosophy failed so conspicuously as in its understanding of the problem of change. Fired by an emotional faith in spontaneity, the common-sense attitude toward change was discarded in favor of a mystical readiness to accept the social consequences of economic improvement, whatever they might be.

- Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation. (via blandarchist)

(I’m an Economics idiot blogging a fragment of something I never read by someone I only heard of five minutes ago in a book about magic.)

(via dadoodoflow)